Infographic Poster – The Design (Part Three)

The next stage was to create the actual main body of the poster. My initial idea was to break each part of the cycle up into individual sections like one of the infographics I looked at before, though I soon realised that would make it seem too literal and would remove the poster element from the design. So instead, I decided to create a basic scene that contained the primary part of the water cycle (that being evaporation, condensation, rain, river flow into the sea and repeat).

UntisdfghjktledThe initial scene without any prompts for a cycle turned out quite nicely. When receiving feedback from my peers, however, I realised that the green hues of the grass and mountains didn’t work particularly well with the blues of the water and sky, as they experienced the same problem as I had earlier (blending of colours). I had originally changed the mountains to green so that the didn’t look out of place with the grass, though I plan to change them back to a browner hue so that they compliment the blues of the colour scheme. (This change will be shown in the next post, however, as I had actually made more progress on the poster before changing quite a few details as a result of feedback).

Untitled3This is how the poster looked after every part had been pieced together. At this point, I was happy to have a complete poster, though the feedback I received from several people on how to improve it was very useful. My next post will contain a side by side comparison of the before and after as well as a commentary on what has changed and why.

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Infographic Poster – The Style (Part Two)

 

After experimenting with the flat design style I realised that it became slightly harder to see everything clearly without the objects merging. To work around this, I thought it would make sense to do some research into existing designs that use flat design and how they are able to bypass the issue. I decided to use a set of printed postcards that I bought at Comiccon last year which represent different locations from the video game Ocarina of Time which is part of the Legend of Zelda series. These prints came in a collection of ten, though I picked the three that I thought made the best use of flat design.
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After analysing the three prints I came to the conclusion that using gradients will help me resolve my issue of everything blending into the page. The gradients will create a sense of depth to the illustrations that will help them contrast from one another on the page. I’m not sure whether to use textures, as I do intend to keep my design as simple as possible. I feel that textures would over complicate the design.

Infographic Poster – The Brief

Having finished our first unit (Concept and Ideation) we have moved onto a new unit called Development and Realisation. This unit is based around designing and producing an A2 infographic poster based on a certain topic of our choice from a list. We are also required to document our research in our sketchbooks and on our blogs. We will be expected to give a verbal presentation of our piece as part of a class critique, in which we must explain what we think went well and what could be improved on.

To begin my research, I decided to visit a page filled with award-winning infographic posters called http://www.informationisbeautifulawards.com/showcase for some inspiration. I have never had much  At this point, I wasn’t sure which topic to pick from the list, as I have never really produced an infographic before and wouldn’t be sure where to start. It only seemed right that I took a look through the award-winning pieces on this site to get an idea of where to start.

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I really liked the layout of this poster, as it flows naturally from top to bottom and draws your eyes through the information in an orderly manner. I also think that it uses a pleasant colour palette, which seems to be vital in an infographic. The illustrations are very basic and flat, though with the use of slight textures they stand out from the page and prove to be very successful focal points. Although the topic of this infographic is not similar to any on our brief, I particularly like the journey style of the design where there is a physical path that leads you through the information.

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The three dimensional style of this one looked minimalistic, yet very pleasing to the eye. Isometric designs seem to work well in vector-based pieces of work. I really like the way that the information is spliced out from the main cubes in the middle. However, this pieces uses a lot of text, which is something we have to avoid doing in our poster. It is going to be challenging to think of a way to represent data that includes very little text.

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The simplistic style of this poster, accompanied by a refreshing colour palette make it seem professional and official. The divides in the poster make it look as if each section is it’s own infographic, which is something that I think works quite well. I definitely would like to try and imitate this style with my poster.

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This one also follows an effectively simplistic theme. I love the fact that the vaccination needle is composed entirely of dots which represent bacteria. The contrast of bright text and images on a dark background is very easy on the eye, so I might try to make mine follow suite.

By this point I was starting to get the idea that a strong set of colours working together in harmony would be a vital part of producing a professional looking poster. All of these award-winning infographics have effective yet simple colour pallets, so one of my first tasks will be to pick a pallet that suites my chosen topic (once I pick it).

Bibliography:

http://www.informationisbeautifulawards.com/showcase

All images link to the page on which they are displayed. All posters belong to their respective artists.