Infographic Poster – The Poster

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As stated previously, the first change to be made was the colour of the mountains. I agreed with the feedback I received saying that the greens blended in to the poster and didn’t stand out for themselves from the water. This is also why I decided to add a strip of brown at the bottom of the hill to represent more clearly the flow of ground water, as it proved difficult to see the strip of water whilst it overlaid the green of the grass. It also looked too similar to the river flowing in the same direction, so I wanted to clear up any confusion.

The most major change that I made to the poster was my attempt to make the piece come together as a whole rather than feeling segregated. By having the key (which represents the change in water states) beneath the title, the poster felt split into three different sections which had a negative impact on the composition as a whole poster. To remedy this, I decided to move the key to the bottom so that it was not splitting the title and cycle apart. The poster, however, still felt split between the title and cycle image, so I decided to move the sun up into the top right corner and have a group of sun rays extending over the whole poster. I feel that this brought the poster together as one image rather than three separate sections and that it looked a lot more professional.

The final change that I made to the final design was on the actual cycle itself. There were various snippets of feedback from my class mates and friends about things I could include/take out that would make the cycle more obvious. The first of these was the most obvious; I was told I should include actual rain and water vapour connecting to the clouds to show the cycle in action. This was a simple task. The next was that the arrow leading to the tree confused the cycle slightly, as plant uptake of water I not part of the major water cycle (one of my friends said that if I’m representing plants on there then why aren’t there humans or animals drinking water as well?). It made sense to remove the arrow in order to keep the focus on the primary water cycle. The last major change was trying to make the ‘snow melt’ on the mountain more obvious. I did this by adding streams of water falling from the drooping chunky of snow into the mountain pool.

After finishing all of these changes, I believe that my poster is at a professional standard of work. I am pleased with the end result and look forward to hearing what my seminar group think in our class critique. Of course, there is always room for improvement, and I am sure that I would be able to make my poster much better if I had a longer time to work on it. However, I am satisfied with the end result and think that it has improved greatly after all of the feedback I have received.

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Infographic Poster – The Design (Part Three)

The next stage was to create the actual main body of the poster. My initial idea was to break each part of the cycle up into individual sections like one of the infographics I looked at before, though I soon realised that would make it seem too literal and would remove the poster element from the design. So instead, I decided to create a basic scene that contained the primary part of the water cycle (that being evaporation, condensation, rain, river flow into the sea and repeat).

UntisdfghjktledThe initial scene without any prompts for a cycle turned out quite nicely. When receiving feedback from my peers, however, I realised that the green hues of the grass and mountains didn’t work particularly well with the blues of the water and sky, as they experienced the same problem as I had earlier (blending of colours). I had originally changed the mountains to green so that the didn’t look out of place with the grass, though I plan to change them back to a browner hue so that they compliment the blues of the colour scheme. (This change will be shown in the next post, however, as I had actually made more progress on the poster before changing quite a few details as a result of feedback).

Untitled3This is how the poster looked after every part had been pieced together. At this point, I was happy to have a complete poster, though the feedback I received from several people on how to improve it was very useful. My next post will contain a side by side comparison of the before and after as well as a commentary on what has changed and why.